The Big Picture

For the sovereign protection of the plants, ecologies & traditional healing wisdom which Indigenous communities have relied on for thousands of years.

“Generational healing for Indigenous people is what medicine conservation is about. Because by ensuring that you have supply of healthy medicine, you are ensuring that every child has healthy medicine, and in turn, that is a chance at a healthy life.”
— Sandor Iron Rope / Oglala Lakota Native American Road Man

The Threat

Keystone medicines, traditional cultures, and their ecologies are threatened with being forgotten, and destroyed.

As the world comes to benefit from their healing potential, how do we ensure the original holders of these sacred medicines are uplifted in this moment of our collective healing?

What's a 'Keystone' Medicine?

Irreplaceable; without substitutes; an essential component of an ecology and culture. 

Ayahuasca
Bufo
Peyote
Iboga
Mushrooms

Our Mission

We work to strengthen Indigenous communities in their efforts to conserve the plant medicines and traditional knowledge they rely on for their healing and cultural survival

Through funding, trusted partnerships, and strategic engagement, we aim to ensure that Indigenous medicine peoples are fortified to successfully navigate mounting pressures from psychedelic interest and ecological crises.

Our Commitment

Our commitment grows from listening.

— In response, the fund will..

Ensure conservation efforts are Indigenous-led.

Maintain a governance process that supports trust between Indigenous partners and funders.

Ensure biocultural conservation is informed by robust ecological and community-based assessments.

Influence non-Indigenous habits to make sustainable choices about medicines.

Ensure sustainable, ethical, culturally-sensitive supply & demand of Indigenous medicines.

Build sustaining infrastructure to support medicine sovereignty for the long-term.

Ayahuasca

Bansteriopis cappi & Psychotria viridis

Ayahuasca

With the proliferation of Ayahuasca tourism and the rapid deforestation of the Amazon, there is a great threat to the integrity of ancestral knowledge, ceremonial lineages, and ecologies of the Banisteriopsis caapi (vine) and Psychotria spp. (Chacruna).


Our Conservation Strategy

Indigenous ayahuasca communities are developing programming  to preserve traditional knowledge, develop integrated agricultural models, and conserve land. Adjunct strategies include fair trade and direct benefit models, and encouraging ethical development of non-Amazonian sources of medicine for non-indigenous ceremony.

Ayahuasca

Risks

  • Deforestation of limited natural habitat (agriculture, illegal drug trade, oil and wood industry)
  • Over-harvest, improper harvest, and Black Market trade
  • Loss of biocultural knowledge through Indigenous urbanization and increased globalization
  • Dramatic increase in global demand and tourism

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Regenerative/Integrated agriculture models and protection of wild Ayahuasca
  • Cultural: language preservation, supporting elder healers, building common spaces for ceremony and community strategy, etc.
  • Economic: Direct benefit from exchange models for traditional/Indigenous users
  • Sovereignty: Strengthening alliances between tribes
  • Legal: Indigenous land rights, importation laws, legal protections for healers, government recognition

Ayahuasca

Projects

  • Alianza Arkana
  • Alliance of Amazonian Medicine Tribes
  • ASOMASHK (Shipibo Healers Union)
  • COSHICOX
  • Indigenous Ayahuasca Conference
  • Nueva Esperanza Cultural Reclamation and agroforestry
  • Oni Xobo
  • Sacha Warmi
  • Suary - Tabu house of the Dawn
  • Temple of the way of Light
  • UMIYAC
  • Yorenka Tasorents

Ayahuasca

Bansteriopis cappi & Psychotria viridis

Ayahuasca

With the proliferation of Ayahuasca tourism and the rapid deforestation of the Amazon, there is a great threat to the integrity of ancestral knowledge, ceremonial lineages, and ecologies of the Banisteriopsis caapi (vine) and Psychotria spp. (Chacruna).


Ayahuasca

Our Conservation Strategy

Indigenous ayahuasca communities are developing programming  to preserve traditional knowledge, develop integrated agricultural models, and conserve land. Adjunct strategies include fair trade and direct benefit models, and encouraging ethical development of non-Amazonian sources of medicine for non-indigenous ceremony.

Ayahuasca

Risks

  • Deforestation of limited natural habitat (agriculture, illegal drug trade, oil and wood industry)
  • Over-harvest, improper harvest, and Black Market trade
  • Loss of biocultural knowledge through Indigenous urbanization and increased globalization
  • Dramatic increase in global demand and tourism

Ayahuasca

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Regenerative/Integrated agriculture models and protection of wild Ayahuasca
  • Cultural: language preservation, supporting elder healers, building common spaces for ceremony and community strategy, etc.
  • Economic: Direct benefit from exchange models for traditional/Indigenous users
  • Sovereignty: Strengthening alliances between tribes
  • Legal: Indigenous land rights, importation laws, legal protections for healers, government recognition

Ayahuasca

Projects

  • Alianza Arkana
  • Alliance of Amazonian Medicine Tribes
  • ASOMASHK (Shipibo Healers Union)
  • COSHICOX
  • Indigenous Ayahuasca Conference
  • Nueva Esperanza Cultural Reclamation and agroforestry
  • Oni Xobo
  • Sacha Warmi
  • Suary - Tabu house of the Dawn
  • Temple of the way of Light
  • UMIYAC
  • Yorenka Tasorents

Ayahuasca

Bufo

Incilius alvarius

Bufo

The Bufo alvarius toad is rapidly being removed from its habitat in massive quantities, and although we know the decline in wild populations is severe, we do not yet know the extent of the devastation.


Our Conservation Strategy

It is vital that “red-list” species threat abatement and restoration studies are completed to understand Bufo’s proximity to extinction. Although there is not a documented history of Indigenous use, because of the threat to Bufo, Indigenous communities in Mexico have been granted regulatory authority to engage in restoration and monitoring of use, and must be empowered to do so. 

Bufo

Risks

  • Over-harvesting
  • Improper milking of gland secretions and Black Market trade 
  • Loss of habitat in Sonoran desert
  • Dramatic increase in global demand

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Complete Threatened Species Sustainability Assessment
  • Habitat: Regeneration and creation of new ponds
  • Legal: Yaqui regulatory authority over harvesting permits
  • Education: Encourage use of synthetic 5meO-DMT

Bufo

Projects

  • Red Line Threatened Species Assessment
  • Toad Ponds Conservation Project
  • Yaqui Intercultural Healing Center

Bufo

Incilius alvarius

Bufo

The Bufo alvarius toad is rapidly being removed from its habitat in massive quantities, and although we know the decline in wild populations is severe, we do not yet know the extent of the devastation.


Bufo

Our Conservation Strategy

It is vital that “red-list” species threat abatement and restoration studies are completed to understand Bufo’s proximity to extinction. Although there is not a documented history of Indigenous use, because of the threat to Bufo, Indigenous communities in Mexico have been granted regulatory authority to engage in restoration and monitoring of use, and must be empowered to do so. 

Bufo

Risks

  • Over-harvesting
  • Improper milking of gland secretions and Black Market trade 
  • Loss of habitat in Sonoran desert
  • Dramatic increase in global demand

Bufo

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Complete Threatened Species Sustainability Assessment
  • Habitat: Regeneration and creation of new ponds
  • Legal: Yaqui regulatory authority over harvesting permits
  • Education: Encourage use of synthetic 5meO-DMT

Bufo

Projects

  • Red Line Threatened Species Assessment
  • Toad Ponds Conservation Project
  • Yaqui Intercultural Healing Center

Bufo

Iboga

Tabernanthe iboga

Iboga

With growing popularity of Ibogaine clinics across North America and Europe, the exclusive wild populations of Tabernanthe iboga in Gabon are already greatly diminished, threatening the ancient rituals and rite of passage ceremonies essential to the Bwitists
— 52 ethnic groups including Bantu and Pygmy peoples.

Our Conservation Strategy

By supporting village-based iboga plantations, fostering relationships with government and exporters, developing fair-trade standards, and exploring iboga alternatives (ie. voacanga), local communities could generate sustainable Ibogaine sources for Indigenous and wide global use.

Iboga

Risks

  • Dramatic increase in Global Demand
  • Overharvest, improper harvest and Black Market trade 
  • Possibility of Gabonese government monopoly on trade
  • Bwiti practitioners unable to access Iboga in their own communities

Opportunities

  • Legal: Creating a framework for Nagoya Protocol that benefits Bwiti communities 
  • Economic: Small village scale plantations and training in cultivation for local and fair-trade markets
  • Reciprocity: Fostering a responsible tourism model that is generative for local communities 
  • Education: De-stigmatization of traditional knowledge in Gabon through key alliances
  • Agriculture: Fostering the cultivation of alternative sources of Ibogaine such as Voacanga africana in west-central Africa

Iboga

Projects

  • Blessings of the Forest
  • Bwiti - Gabon National Ngoya Protocol Framework
  • Bwiti Healers and Practitioners Individual Grants
  • Ethical Tourism Assessment with Communities
  • Organizational Infrastructure development for direct support to villages
  • West-Central African plantation investments

Iboga

Tabernanthe iboga

Iboga

With growing popularity of Ibogaine clinics across North America and Europe, the exclusive wild populations of Tabernanthe iboga in Gabon are already greatly diminished, threatening the ancient rituals and rite of passage ceremonies essential to the Bwitists
— 52 ethnic groups including Bantu and Pygmy peoples.

Iboga

Our Conservation Strategy

By supporting village-based iboga plantations, fostering relationships with government and exporters, developing fair-trade standards, and exploring iboga alternatives (ie. voacanga), local communities could generate sustainable Ibogaine sources for Indigenous and wide global use.

Iboga

Risks

  • Dramatic increase in Global Demand
  • Overharvest, improper harvest and Black Market trade 
  • Possibility of Gabonese government monopoly on trade
  • Bwiti practitioners unable to access Iboga in their own communities

Iboga

Opportunities

  • Legal: Creating a framework for Nagoya Protocol that benefits Bwiti communities 
  • Economic: Small village scale plantations and training in cultivation for local and fair-trade markets
  • Reciprocity: Fostering a responsible tourism model that is generative for local communities 
  • Education: De-stigmatization of traditional knowledge in Gabon through key alliances
  • Agriculture: Fostering the cultivation of alternative sources of Ibogaine such as Voacanga africana in west-central Africa

Iboga

Projects

  • Blessings of the Forest
  • Bwiti - Gabon National Ngoya Protocol Framework
  • Bwiti Healers and Practitioners Individual Grants
  • Ethical Tourism Assessment with Communities
  • Organizational Infrastructure development for direct support to villages
  • West-Central African plantation investments

Iboga

Peyote

Lophophora williamsii

Peyote

Used for over 10,000 years, with over 300,000 Native Americans currently relying on it for healing of addiction and cultural survival, Peyote is greatly threatened and without intervention, could be extinct within 20 years. 


Our Conservation Strategy

Through regeneration of native peyote populations, spiritual and ecological harvest, land access, community engagement, and regional nurseries, indigenous communities are actively reclaiming protection and stewardship of their sacred medicine.

Peyote

Risks

  • Loss of habitat due to agricultural, mining, and energy production 
  • Over-harvest, poaching, improper harvest, and Black Market tourism
  • Disconnection from traditional bio-cultural knowledge
  • Lack of Indigenous access to land
  • Pressure on medicine sovereignty from psychedelic movement

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Repopulation and regeneration of native habitat
  • Cultural: Conservation education at sacred sites and at home
  • Legal: Protection of Indigenous sovereign regulatory frameworks
  • Access: Sustainable distribution systems 
  • Community: Outreach and organizational capacity building
  • Land-base: Reconnection to and protection of land access through strategies such as ownership, leasing, novel relationship building

Peyote

Projects

  • Indigenous Peyote Conservation Initiative
  • Sia - Numi Husi Kahne
  • Tribal Nursery Development Initiative
  • Wixarika Territory Protection Projects
  • Yaqui Inter-Tribal Healing Center - Peyote Project

Peyote

Lophophora williamsii

Peyote

Used for over 10,000 years, with over 300,000 Native Americans currently relying on it for healing of addiction and cultural survival, Peyote is greatly threatened and without intervention, could be extinct within 20 years. 


Peyote

Our Conservation Strategy

Through regeneration of native peyote populations, spiritual and ecological harvest, land access, community engagement, and regional nurseries, indigenous communities are actively reclaiming protection and stewardship of their sacred medicine.

Peyote

Risks

  • Loss of habitat due to agricultural, mining, and energy production 
  • Over-harvest, poaching, improper harvest, and Black Market tourism
  • Disconnection from traditional bio-cultural knowledge
  • Lack of Indigenous access to land
  • Pressure on medicine sovereignty from psychedelic movement

Peyote

Opportunities

  • Ecological: Repopulation and regeneration of native habitat
  • Cultural: Conservation education at sacred sites and at home
  • Legal: Protection of Indigenous sovereign regulatory frameworks
  • Access: Sustainable distribution systems 
  • Community: Outreach and organizational capacity building
  • Land-base: Reconnection to and protection of land access through strategies such as ownership, leasing, novel relationship building

Peyote

Projects

  • Indigenous Peyote Conservation Initiative
  • Sia - Numi Husi Kahne
  • Tribal Nursery Development Initiative
  • Wixarika Territory Protection Projects
  • Yaqui Inter-Tribal Healing Center - Peyote Project

Peyote

Mushrooms

Psilocybe sp.

Mushrooms

As psilocybin becomes a frontline medicine of the psychedelic renaissance in the 2000s we are committed to remembering and addressing trauma left by psychedelic interests of the 60s in the communities of the Mazatec Sierra.

Today, traditional lineages are disrupted and knowledge of the 15+ psilocybin fungus species and their specific uses and ceremony has dwindled. Indigenous medicine families are urbanized, live in financial poverty, and generally have lost access to their traditional medicine ways.

Our Conservation Strategy

By supporting village-based iboga plantations, fostering relationships with government and exporters, developing fair-trade standards, and exploring iboga alternatives (ie. voacanga), local communities could generate sustainable Ibogaine sources for Indigenous and wide global use.

Mushrooms

Risks

  • Very few intact wisdom and healing traditions due to past intercultural interactions
  • Uneven benefit from psychedelic tourism to local communities 
  • Loss of species from agricultural practices
  • Further loss of biocultural knowledge through urbanization

Opportunities

  • Economic: Direct benefit from exchange models to traditional/Indigenous users
  • Cultural: Youth programs for language and traditional ceremonies 
  • Reciprocity: Community needs assessment for reparations work
  • Legal: Economic frameworks in Mexico for Nagoya Protocols
  • Ecological: Land and species preservation
  • Clinical: Intercultural healing clinics

Mushrooms

Projects

  • Bio-cultural Needs Assessment
  • Community based Reparations package (urban and rural)
  • Mexico Nagoya protocol legal framework and consultation process

Mushrooms

Psilocybe sp.

Mushrooms

As psilocybin becomes a frontline medicine of the psychedelic renaissance in the 2000s we are committed to remembering and addressing trauma left by psychedelic interests of the 60s in the communities of the Mazatec Sierra.

Today, traditional lineages are disrupted and knowledge of the 15+ psilocybin fungus species and their specific uses and ceremony has dwindled. Indigenous medicine families are urbanized, live in financial poverty, and generally have lost access to their traditional medicine ways.

Mushrooms

Our Conservation Strategy

By supporting village-based iboga plantations, fostering relationships with government and exporters, developing fair-trade standards, and exploring iboga alternatives (ie. voacanga), local communities could generate sustainable Ibogaine sources for Indigenous and wide global use.

Mushrooms

Risks

  • Very few intact wisdom and healing traditions due to past intercultural interactions
  • Uneven benefit from psychedelic tourism to local communities 
  • Loss of species from agricultural practices
  • Further loss of biocultural knowledge through urbanization

Mushrooms

Opportunities

  • Economic: Direct benefit from exchange models to traditional/Indigenous users
  • Cultural: Youth programs for language and traditional ceremonies 
  • Reciprocity: Community needs assessment for reparations work
  • Legal: Economic frameworks in Mexico for Nagoya Protocols
  • Ecological: Land and species preservation
  • Clinical: Intercultural healing clinics

Mushrooms

Projects

  • Bio-cultural Needs Assessment
  • Community based Reparations package (urban and rural)
  • Mexico Nagoya protocol legal framework and consultation process

Mushrooms

Our Governance Model

Assessment Based,
Indigenous Led.

— Catalyzing Indigenous-led projects with supportive bridge activities.

The IMC governance structure is comprised of three committees to inclusively represent Indigenous and western expertise on the conservation implementation of each medicine, the operational management of the fund, and the spiritual integrity of its overall processes.

Spiritual

Spiritual Advisors weave prayers into ceremony throughout the year for the success of the projects and each biocultural medicine. Their insight and guidance is then incorporated into recommendations.

Conservation

The Conservation Committee is comprised of technical specialists and indigenous community representatives experienced in both traditional knowledge and scientific methodology. The committee interprets assessments and translates these into a suite of highly leveraged projects, appropriate for each medicine. These recommendations are brought forward for final approvals.

Operations

The Operations Committee is made up of the Board and Staff of the IMC Fund and negotiates the logistics of each decision-making step, ensuring the successful distribution and monitoring of funds and project technical support.

team

Who we are.

— Team, Funders, Partners, Advisors

Board of Directors

Lucy Benally
Miguel Evanjuanoy 
T. Cody Swift
David Bronner

Operations Committee

Miriam Volat
Kelly Erhart
Sutton King
Les Szabo
Tanya Kommemen

Conservation Committee & Spiritual Advisors

Claude Guislain
Miguel Evanjuanoy
Lucy Benally
Lila Vega
Anahi Ochoa
Anny Ortiz
Miriam Volat
Kat Harrison
Ricard Faura
Eusebio De La Cruz

Technical Assessment Partners

COntact Us

Let's grow together.

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